Saturday, 3 November 2012

Wicca Refreshed; Likely Lineage Revealed

My Review of
Wicca Magical Beginnings - The history and origins of the rituals and other practices found in the Book of Shadows of Gerald Gardner and other traditions of modern initiatory Pagan Witchcraft
Sorita d'Este (Author), David Rankine (Author)

Wicca Refreshed; Likely Lineage Revealed.

   
This book entails a refreshing and objective overview of the plausible origins and developments of many magickal aspects and their development into modern Wiccan traditions. Chapter by chapter the authors examine individual practices and their developments over time such as the Magick circle, Wiccan Rede and Witches Athame for example.


Having recently read Ronald Hutton's research in The Triumph of the Moon, which seems to demonstrate that despite the history of Cunning Folk, Wise Women and many others, that Wicca as it exists today has little or no direct connection with any magick traditions of earlier times, this book - if we are able to join the dots between movements and grimoires, convincingly portrays an opposite view. Here we see that the Wiccan traditions do indeed follow a historical lineage, even if individual practices have understandably changed over time - by which mean we may see that they are living traditions rather than archived curiosities, that the spirit of magick has maintained a constant and responsive cultural presence, possibly since very ancient times. This book also explores how Gerald Gardener, the apparent father of modern Wicca, may owe more than is usually stated to Aleister Crowley, Charles Leland, the Key of Solomon and Frazier's Golden Bough among others.


The co author's Sorita D'este and David Rankine provide numerous references in an extensive bibliography for the academically determined to double check their assertions and contexts, some good humored asides of interest and some objective conjecture that invites an opened mind to assess for themselves- based on the evidences gathered - the likely origins of each aspect under consideration.

As a believer in informed understanding I would therefore recommend this book, to be considered in conjunction with other authors research, to any who seek a practical view of the possible lineage of Wicca and Magickal traditions in Britain and the World today.


Bright Blessings to those who follow Truth.


2 comments:

  1. Ronald Hutton has consistently, and sometimes very aggressively, attempted to give the impression that he has somehow proven that Wicca lacks ancient roots.

    However, Hutton has also always been very careful to place a very small asterisk next to his claims, and this asterisk almost invariably goes unnoticed. The fact is that Hutton has always admitted that the magical roots of Wicca, as opposed to its religious roots, go back at least two thousand years!

    But wait, there's more. Just a few years after "Triumph" was published, Hutton went even further and admitted that the RELIGIOUS roots of Wicca also go back at least two millennia! He did this in the book "Witches Druids and King Arthur", much of which is in the form of a weasel worded attempt to explain away the fact that his signature achievement as a public intellectual is completely without merit.

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    1. @Apuleius Platonicus, that's such an interesting response, I am grateful to you for sharing this, best wishes ~

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